07
October
2014
|
11:34 AM
America/New_York

Ohio State University News Tips 10/7/14

Concerns rising about the dangers of increased antibiotic resistance.  New and deadlier strains of super-bacteria, rising health care costs, and lost productivity, all point to a growing crisis in antibiotic resistance. Dr. Lonnie King, dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine, and executive dean of the Health Sciences Colleges at Ohio State, served on the working group for the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology to examine the problem of antibiotic resistance and provide actionable recommendations to stem the growing concerns. He is available to comment on the report released on September 28. Some of the committee’s recommendations include improved surveillance and response, incentives for new drug development, requiring changes in animal agriculture, and stewarding better use in human health. CONTACT: Melissa Weber, weber.254@osu.edu, 614-292-3752.

Community leaders to discuss investing in early childhood - Oct. 9. Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman and Brenda Drake, Ohio State University first lady, will join a blue-ribbon panel to discuss the need to expand of early childhood (pre-kindergarten) programs and how to fund them, from 3-5 p.m.in the Faculty Club, 181 S. Oval Drive. Other panelists include Ohio Sen. Peggy Lehner, 6th District, and representatives from the Governor’s Office. The event precedes the Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy’s (CECC) annual symposium, “The Case for Pre-K,” which will be held 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10, at the Faculty Club. CONTACT: Elaine Joy, CECC communications,joy.122@osu.edu.

Ohio State’s free, public lecture series, SCIENCE SUNDAYS features noted neutrino hunter - October 12. Move over Higgs—it's neutrino time. Ray Jayawardhana, dean of Science and professor, York University, Toronto, Canada, presents Neutrino Hunters: Chasing a Ghostly Particle to Unlock Cosmic Secrets, a thrilling journey into the shadowy world of very elusive particles. Don’t miss this captivating detective story awash in colorful characters and awesome cosmic implications. The lecture takes place from 3 to 4 p.m. in the Wexner Film/Video Theater, 1871 N. High St. CONTACT: Sandi Rutkowski, The Ohio State University College of Arts and Sciences: 614-292-4759, Rutkowski.1@osu.edu. SEE: http://artsandsciences.osu.edu/science-sundays

Ebola Pandemic? Bird Flu? Zombie Virus? A Public Discussion – Oct. 16.

Populations have been exposed to several major disease outbreaks in recent years, both globally and nationally. The bird flu, swine flu and now major Ebola pandemic in Africa have swept over the world within a few years. More recently, the United States has experienced a resurgence of disease outbreaks, such as the mumps and measles, in many American communities and college campuses — including in Ohio. But what are the actual health risks from these infectious diseases, both major and minor? What are the factors driving this spread of old and new viruses? Has the public been well served by our media when reporting on these cases? Are they accurately reporting the risks?
Ohio State’s School of Communication’s Health Sciences Frontiers program will host a public conversation from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 16, at the WOSU@COSI studios, 333 W. Broad St., to talk about the flow of information and health risks from infectious disease outbreaks. Panelists include Larry Schlesinger, chair, Ohio State’s Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity, Vicki Friemuth, director, Southern Center for Communication, Health, & Poverty, University of Georgia and Richard Harris, science correspondent, NPR.
The event is free and open to allwith seating beginning at 6:30 p.m. CONTACT: Erik Nisbet, assistant professor, School of Communications; director, Health Sciences Frontiers, Nisbet.5@osu.edu, (614) 247-1693.
http://artsandsciences.osu.edu/events/a-panicked-public-viral-flows-of-information-and-health-risks-from-infectious-disease-outbrea.

Ohio State study: In A Bad Mood? Head to Facebook and Find Someone Worse Off.When people are in a bad mood, they are more likely to actively search social networking sites like Facebook to find friends who are doing even worse than they are, a new study suggests.Researchers found that, in general, people use social media to connect with people who are posting positive and success-oriented updates.“But when people are in a negative mood, they start to show more interest in the less attractive, less successful people on their social media sites,” said Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick, co-author of the study and professor of communication at The Ohio State University.These findings give more context to recent studies that found people who spend a lot of time on Facebook tend to be more frustrated, angry and lonely – presumably because of all the happy updates from friends that make them feel inadequate. SEE: http://news.osu.edu/news/2014/10/02/in-a-bad-mood-head-to-facebook-and-find-someone-worse-off/.

Ohio State hosts panel on “Climate Change and National Security” – Oct. 16. Climate change will have an impact on operations of the United States Armed Forces and the international events, both humanitarian relief efforts and arms conflicts, to which they respond. Rear Admiral Jonathan White, oceanographer of the U.S. Navy, will discuss the impacts of climate change on the U.S. Navy’s operations as well as actions being taken to prepare for these changes. Additional speakers and a panel discussion will allow continued dialogue on climate change, national security and humanitarian relief with perspectives from other branches of the military and research communities.


The panel takes place from 2 to 3:30 p.m. at Ohio State’s Byrd Polar Research Center, 108 Scott Hall, 1090 Carmack Rd. Media may attend in person or view the event online. SEE:http://bprc.osu.edu/education/blog/topics/climateexplorations/.

The person listed as the CONTACT will have the most current information about the story. Call on our media relations staff for help with any Ohio State story: Jane Carroll, 614-292-5220 or carroll.296@osu.edu; Liz Cook, 614-292-7276 or cook.17@osu.edu; Gary Lewis, 614-688-2048 or lewis.330@osu.edu; or Amy Murray, 614-292-8385 or murray-goedde.1@osu.edu.